16-year-old techie claims his search engine is 47 per cent more accurate...

16-year-old techie claims his search engine is 47 per cent more accurate than Google

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Anmol Tukrel

Google has to be one of the fastest search engines in the world. With its technology farms spread all over the world and the best algorithms incorporated within, Google is one of the most used and most preferred search engines out there. Also, Google is said to have one of the fastest, most accurate search results as compared to other search engines that exist. However, a 16-year-old techie is bold enough to state that he has built a search engine and claims that his product is 47 per cent more accurate than Google’s search engine.

According to a report filed on The Times of India, a 16-year-old Indian-origin techie from Canada has built a search engine and claims that he has made it 47 per cent more accurate than what Google’s churns out in its search results.

Canadian citizen Sixteen-year-old Anmol Tukrel is an Indian-born techie and has designed a search engine all by himself. He also claims that apart from it being 47 per cent more accurate than Google’s search engine, it is also 21 per cent more accurate on an overall average.

Tukrel is just a standard 10 student and has been working on the project for just a couple of months. He has taken around 60 hours code and build a search engine, which is a part of the submission to the Google Science Fair. The Google competition is applicable for those between ages 13 and 18.

Tukrel told TOI, when he was in India for a short internship in Bangalore, that when he came to know about Google already having a personalized search engine, he planned to take it to a next level. Tukrel’s development kit included only a computer with at least 1GB of free storage space, a python-language development environment, a spreadsheet program and access to Google and New York Times.

He managed to test out his product’s accuracy with limiting his search query to the current year’s news articles from The New York Times. He then created numerous fictitious users, each with a different interest and other corresponding web histories. This information was then fed to both Google and his search engine, after which, he compared the results between the two.

Tukrel has submitted his paper, of research and his findings, to the International High School Journal of Science. He now hopes to study further with computer science at Stanford University. He is presently running a small company on his own, named Tacocat Computers, with consent from his parents.

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